Biomedical Informatics Program

Graduate Certificate in Public Health Informatics

Program Description

The Public Health Informatics Certificate is designed to enable students to acquire the core knowledge that applies to the fundamentals, principles, and practice of public health informatics. This certificate option consists of 18 credit hours of graduate level courses which are presented using on-line technology.

If after taking courses in the certificate program, a certificate-seeking student decides to pursue the M.S.B.I. degree, the student must submit a new and complete application to become a degree-seeking student, and must meet all requirements for admission to the M.S.B.I. program. Previous coursework taken as a certificate seeking student does not guarantee acceptance into the M.S.B.I. degree-seeking program. If accepted into the degree program, credits with the prefix MI taken as a certificate seeking student will be automatically applied towards the degree.

Gainful Employment Disclosure

Curriculum

Students must successfully complete:

No. of Credits: 3

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: This on-line, interactive course is an introductory survey of the discipline of biomedical informatics. This course will introduce the student to the use of computers for processing, organizing, retrieving and utilizing biomedical information at the molecular, biological system, clinical and healthcare organization levels. The course is targeted at individuals with varied backgrounds including medical, nursing, pharmacy, administration, and computer science. The course will describe essential concepts in biomedical informatics that are derived from medicine, computer science and the social sciences.

Learning Objectives:

  • Demonstrate in writing and verbally a basic understanding of the learned concepts of biomedical informatics and their direct application to healthcare.
  • Demonstrate the ability to compare, select, apply and integrate multiple technologies in and across a healthcare organization.
  • Discuss key legal and ethical issues that must be considered when implementing biomedical technology and supporting information systems.
  • Differentiate multiple methods to evaluate the costs versus benefits of implementing biomedical information systems.
  • Produce evidence of a forward thinking ability to stay current in biomedical informatics.

No. of Credits: 3

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: This course introduces students to theoretical, statistical, and practical concepts underlying modern medical decision making. Students will be provided a review of the multiple methods of knowledge generation for clinical decision support systems (CDSS) and create their own prototype of CDSS. Current implementations of stand-alone and integrated CDSS will be evaluated. Techniques for planning, management, and evaluation of CDSS implementations will be reviewed. Human factors, including work-flow integration, and the ethical, legal and regulatory aspects of CDSS use will be explored, as applicable to commercial implementations in patient care settings. Future models of healthcare, supported by CDSS and evidence-based medicine, will be discussed and reviewed.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, the student will comprehend the following issues and objectives:

  • Describe the scope and kinds of clinical decision support systems; analyze CDSS effectiveness in terms of implementing for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.
  • Evaluate the linkage of CDSS to the basic concepts of evidence-based medicine.
  • Apply practice guidelines for clinical decision support, including commonly-used formalisms and authoring tools for computer-interpretable guidelines.
  • Describe the social and political forces driving implementations of CDSS in the clinical field.
  • Compare and contrast the types of CDSS available in commercial and research implementations.
  • Apply statistical methods and logic concepts, such as probability, regression, Boolean logic, set theory, and inference, to underlying medical decision making.
  • Evaluate at least three methods of knowledge generation for CDSS, including decision trees, neural networks, and Bayesian analysis.
  • Compare the advantages and disadvantages of supervised vs. unsupervised learning methods in data-mining applications.
  • Evaluate how CDSS fold into the overall hospital and/or medical office health information technology environment.
  • Analyze technology and business characteristics of successful CDSS implementations using recent industry cases as guidelines and input to build student's own attributes of an effective CDSS implementation.
  • Recognize business and clinical implementation and maintenance challenges in commercial CDSS projects, as well as possible resolutions to these challenges.
  • Assess risks involved with poor CDSS implementations from the following standpoints: health outcomes, quality of care, medical error rates, and patient and provider satisfaction standpoints.
  • Discuss ethical and regulatory issues involved in design and implementation of CDSS systems.
  • Identify opportunities for use of CDSS in personal health records and shared decision making.
  • Identify a basic clinical problem or an operational situation with the purpose of simulating an expert system to assist clinicians with problem resolution process.
  • Present a full implementation of CDSS with commercially applicable attributes, aimed at solving specific clinical problem or improving clinical workflow.
  • Integrate theoretical and practical knowledge of current and future CDSS learned in class, to apply in healthcare settings.

No. of Credits: 3

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: Public health informatics is the systematic application of information and computer science and technology to public health practice, research and learning. This course focuses on developing the knowledge and skills of systemic application of information, computer science, and technology to public health practice. Students will acquire a basic understanding of informatics in public health practice, and be able to apply the skills of using some informatics tools in public health practices.

Learning Objectives:

  • Define public health informatics, and its role in public health practice at local, state, national, and international levels
  • Illustrate at least three examples of how public health informatics supports disease surveillance.
  • Report on informatics applications that enhance vital statistics and registry maintenance
  • List structure and content of data sources commonly available to public health professionals
  • Distinguish the roles of HL-7 and Snomed CT in helping to achieve system interoperability
  • Characterize available public health information systems applicable to local and state public health practice
  • Prepare GIS maps using freely available software and data sources
  • Use an open-source Content Management System to create dynamic website pages with public health content
  • Examine potential case clusters relevant to public health practice using temporal and spatial scanning software
  • Compare and contrast change management and project management as critical administrative tools in public health informatics

No. of Credits: 3

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: This course covers major concepts, systems and methodology in managing health care information systems. Topics will include concepts in: system implementation and support, information architecture, IT governance in health care, information systems standards, organizing IT services, strategic planning, IT alignment with the health care facility, and management's role in major IT initiatives.

Learning Objectives:

The conclusion of the course students will be able to:

  • Design strategies for management in acquiring, planning, and implementing major health care IT initiatives
  • Implement sound project management methodologies in health care IT systems, which are critical to the strategic plan of the facility
  • Evaluate technologies such as electronic medical records, enterprise resource planning, or enterprise collaboration systems, which can facilitate a health care facility’s business processes
  • Integrate the roles of stakeholders, IT staff, and management in designing and implementing health information technology projects
  • Analyze legal compliance requirements that organizations must comply with while implementing and supporting health care information systems. (i.e. HIPAA regulations and JCAHO standards)
  • Evaluate health care information technology systems, projects, and provider requirements.

And any two of the following courses:

No. of Credits: 3

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: This course introduces the fundamental principles of project management from an information technology perspective, with an emphasis on healthcare industry applications. Fundamental aspects of project management are covered including project integration, the management of scope, time, cost, quality, human resources, communications, and risks. Discussion also includes project management software as well as organizational management aspects such as project planning, team building, organizational structure, and control mechanisms.

Learning Objectives:

After completion of the course, students should be able to:

  • Understand the genesis of project management and its importance to improving the success of information technology projects
  • Demonstrate knowledge of project management terms and techniques such as:
    • The triple constraint of project management
    • The project management knowledge areas and process groups
    • The project life cycle
    • Tools and techniques of project management such as:
      • Project selection methods
      • Work breakdown structures
      • Network diagrams, critical path analysis, and critical chain scheduling
      • Cost estimates
      • Earned value management
      • Motivation theory and team building
  • Apply project management concepts by working on an individual or group project as project manager or active team member
  • Demonstrate how to use Microsoft Project 2007 or 2010 as well as other software to help plan and manage a small project
  • Appreciate the importance of project management skills learned in class:
    • Sharing examples of project management identified in assigned readings and course work
    • Using project management knowledge and skills developed in this class in other settings
  • Appraise how decisions made by health care leadership impact data management and health information systems
  • Develop strategies to identify options for health information organizations to adapt to changes in their environment.

No. of Credits: 3

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: This course covers from basic to intermediate knowledge of the concept, the design and the implementation of database applications in healthcare. Students will study tools and data models for designing databases such as E-R Model and SQL. The course also covers Relational DBMS systems such as SQL Server, Access, Oracle and mySQL. Besides, database connectivity design (essential in data-driven web development) and database administration will also be introduced.

Students will practice designing, developing and implementing a test relational online health IT database application (myHealth) through a comprehensive project that contains the above topics.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of the course, student will be able to:

  • Identify the key elements of database management system and applications in healthcare.
  • Plan, document, and design a medical informatics database application.
  • Identify and model healthcare database application using ER Model and query against the database with SQL.
  • Identify the key concepts and process in order to SQL server, Access, Oracle or mySQL DBMS systems to build up a data-driven web application.
  • Identify the basic concepts of database administration and data warehouse for decision support system (DSS).

No. of Credits: 3

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: The course will cover concepts, applications and techniques of data security in healthcare system. Topics include introduction, design principles, intrusion detection, policy assurance, attacks and penetration, access control, risks and vulnerabilities, database security, web security, cryptography, identity theft, viruses, authentication technologies, personnel and physical security issues, and issues of law and privacy. Areas of particular focus include secure healthcare system design, implementation, data encryption and decryption, attacks, and techniques for responding to security breaches.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, students will have gained knowledge of information security and healthcare information security. Students will be able to use security tools and devices to encrypt data to enhance access control and to increase application and system security.

  • Name Information Security (InfoSec) principles and approaches.
  • Prioritize threats to healthcare information resources.
  • Define an information security strategy and architecture.
  • Plan for and respond to intruders in a healthcare information system.
  • Demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of public cryptography and skills of steganography.
  • Apply encryption techniques for data and emails.

No. of Credits: 3

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: The understanding of telecommunications and networking is imperative for adequate functioning of health care organizations. This is due to the convergence of computing, data management, telecommunications and the increasing number of applications of information technology in the health care arena and medical facilities. The knowledge of these key areas of information systems also becomes essential for competitive advantage. This course combines the basic technical concepts of data communications, telecommunications and networking with the health care IT management aspects and practical applications.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of the course, the students should be able to:

  • Identify current concepts of data communications and networking and how to implement them in a medical treatment facility.
  • Execute a network implementation by having managerial knowledge of the technical aspects of data communications and computer networks.
  • Identify various security risks to a network and ways to minimize them.
  • Assess the current trends in telecommunications and networking and the implications for health care and medical facilities.
  • Analyze legal compliance requirements that organizations must comply with while implementing and supporting health care information networks. (i.e., HIPAA regulations and JCAHO standards).
  • Communicate the basic concepts of information assurance and its implications in network economy.
  • Evaluate the implementation and use of wireless networks in medical facilities to enhance patient care and increase the efficiency of providers.
  • Determine how emerging end-user devices in the health care arena impacts computer networks, system security HIPAA Security compliance and integrate with electronic health records.

No. of Credits: 3

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: The need to create effective, new solutions and innovative interventions to deliver quality patient care outside of the traditional medical setting is at the forefront of society today. The basis of this course will be providing a solid educational foundation for systems design & analysis, as it relates to current and future healthcare systems. In addition, this course will build upon the fundamental systems design & analysis to explore current and future healthcare systems that will include integration of disparate clinical principles healthcare systems, mobile technologies , as well as a combination of remote-monitoring technology, sensors, and online communications and intelligence to improve patient adherence, engagement and clinical outcomes.

Learning Objectives:

  • In the role of a systems analyst, investigate and understand the foundations of systems analysis & design theory and applications as it relates to healthcare systems.
  • Establish skills needed to successfully function as a healthcare systems analyst.
  • Experience and gain understanding of the added value of mobile technologies in the healthcare marketplace.
  • Define and understand the role and of stakeholders as users of healthcare information systems, and give examples of each.
  • Manage multiple roles of business drivers and technology drivers, as they relate to the healthcare industry.
  • Distinguish between knowledge, process, and communications goals for healthcare systems.
  • Employ the essential phases of systems development that includes purpose, inputs, and outputs of a healthcare system.
  • Objectively judge and evaluate wireless networking in healthcare systems from a systems analysis & design perspective.
  • Incorporate 10 basic principles of systems development as it relates to healthcare systems.
  • Use a variety of automated tools for systems development in creation of state of the art healthcare systems.

No. of Credits: 3

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: The dynamics of human-computer interaction (HCI) directly impacts health care. This course will introduce the student to usable interfaces and the study of social consequences associated with the changing environment due to technology innovation.

Learning Objectives:

  • Examine the need for evaluating health care information system user interfaces
  • Analyze the roles of stakeholders in designing health information user interfaces
  • Determine appropriate measurement methods to evaluate interfaces and interaction from the prospective of individual end users isolating your know knowledge from the evaluation
  • Appraise ongoing evaluation barriers and facilitators at various phases of design and provide the necessary insight regarding interface integration
  • Determine appropriate HCI measurement methods for various evaluation projects
  • Examine the need for evaluating health care information technology systems and the impact of HCI in error prevention and real time applications

No. of Credits: 3

Pre-Requisite: MI 5120, MI 5130, MI 5200

Description: This on-line, interactive course will introduce students to various evaluation methods for healthcare informatics systems, projects and proposals. Students will consider both quantitative and qualitative methods of evaluation as they examine the design and implementation processes.

Topics will include:

  • Why to evaluate health care informatics projects
  • Deciding what to evaluate
  • Deciding when evaluation should occur
  • Quantitative evaluation methods
  • Overview of some descriptive and inferential statistical methods
  • Barriers and facilitators to project implementation
  • Stakeholders, both internal and external to an organization

Learning Objectives:

  1. Examine the need for evaluating health care information technology systems and projects.
  2. Analyze the roles of stakeholders in designing health information technology evaluation projects.
  3. Compare and contrast quantitative and qualitative evaluation methods and their application to healthcare informatics evaluation studies.
  4. Create an evaluation proposal for a health care information technology system or project.
  5. Appraise ongoing evaluation barriers and facilitators at various phases of an evaluation process in health care informatics.
  6. Explain the importance of usability assessment and describes techniques for completing usability assessment on information systems.
  7. Determine appropriate measurement methods for various evaluation projects.
  8. Explain the difference between cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit analyses in the design and implementation of an evaluation process.

No. of Credits: 3

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: This on-line course is an introduction to the management of employees in health care organizations. Students will gain a working knowledge of how to manage personal, interpersonal, and group processes by having the interpersonal skills to assume responsibility for leading and promoting teamwork among diverse stakeholders. Students will learn to manage individual and group behaviors in improving organizational productivity and performance. Through experiential learning, students will learn to integrate home, work, and educational observations and experiences and to convert them into proactive practical applications for growth and renewal.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Evaluate basic concepts of organizational behavior and organizational development,
  • Critique the major theories of organizational behavior, including McGregor, Maslow, Herzberg, McClelland, Blake and Mouton, Fiedler, Vroom, Skinner and Alderfer,
  • Assess basic behavioral models of communication, motivation, performance organizational learning and development, and leadership,
  • Analyze his/her leadership/management style,
  • Synthesize the structure and dynamics of the small group process, and
  • Appraise the fundamentals and strategies of organizational change.

No. of Credits: 3

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: The purpose of this course is to introduce students to grant development and preparation so that they can participate in the process of obtaining public or private funds to support research, education, and/or service projects.

Learning Objectives:

  • To participate in the process of obtaining public or private funds to support research, education, and/or service projects.

No. of Credits: 3

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: This course provides an introduction to, and overview of, consumer health informatics and Web 2.0 applications used in healthcare. It explores the development of consumers as e-Patients and tools such as personal health records (PHRs), as well as the fluid nature of Web 2.0 in medicine. Students will learn from a combination of lectures and a hands-on approach of interacting directly with the tools and technologies discussed.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completing MI 6410, the student will be able to:

  • Demonstrate the roles of Web 2.0 and mHealth applications for consumers and healthcare professionals
  • Navigate social media and networking applications
  • Utilize tools such as RSS readers, Twitter, and podcasts to access and manage information
  • Determine beneficial uses of the collaborative toolbox
  • Delineate healthcare risks inherent to consumers with Web 2.0

No. of Credits: 3

Pre-Requisite: MI 5120

Description: This course immerses students in the technical, business, cultural and organizational dynamics typically encountered during HIT systems selection and contract negotiation process. Real world case studies, replete with dynamic political, financial and technical roadblocks and opportunities, will be used to introduce the student to skills required to make the best cultural decisions and negotiate a viable contract.

Learning Objectives:

  • Discuss and document the six phases of the procurement
  • Analyze factors that are important when qualifying and selecting suppliers for a project requirement
  • Examine the key factors, including risk factors that affect buyer/supplier decisions concerning contract pricing and the selection of the proper contract type
  • Analyze the application of e-Procurement and other types of supplier bidding models available
  • Evaluate technical, management, commercial and ethical requirements, and then prepare a Request for Proposal (RFP)
  • Determine the key factors used when negotiating an agreement or evaluating competitive proposals and establish a negotiating strategy
  • Analyze factors that are important when qualifying and selecting suppliers for a project requirement and;
  • Develop the skills to negotiate fair and ethical contracts which beneficially serve the business needs and missions of all parties involved

No. of Credits: 3

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: This course provides the conceptual and technical skills needed in leading health information technology. It is designed to create a profound understanding of leadership at the cognitive and action levels to enable health information leaders to optimize decision-making in the workplace. Students review remarkable leaders, organizations, and teams in order to hone their own observation, sense-making, and innovating skills in a health information setting. This leadership course reviews and builds upon the basic knowledge of leadership provided in the organizational behavior course by expanding the scope and depth of the student's knowledge of leadership theories, conflict management techniques, and by developing the student's self-knowledge of his or her preferred leadership styles.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the historical development of leadership theory and its impact upon health information technology
  • Appraise how decisions made by health care leadership impact data management and health information systems
  • Compare the main conceptual approaches to health information technology leadership, and their strengths and weaknesses
  • Identify the key principles and practices of leadership in order to improve leadership skills in health information technology
  • Apply organizational leadership concepts in a health information setting through critical thinking
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of particular organizational leadership styles in health information settings
  • Explain current trends toward greater employee empowerment and team leadership
  • Develop strategies to identify options for health information organizations to adapt to changes in their environment
  • Evaluate and anticipate places in which you will develop and extend your leadership in health information organizations during your career and lifetime

No. of Credits: 3

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: Lean Six Sigma for Health Care (Yellow Belt) participants will learn the basic philosophy, tools, and techniques to deliver breakthrough business improvements that will reduce waiting times, improve quality, and reduce costs in a health care environment. More specifically, they will learn to apply a comprehensive set of 15-20 Lean Six Sigma process improvement tools by using the PDCA (Plan, Do, Check, Act) problem solving model. They will learn techniques for both quantitative and non-quantitative analysis, as well as methods and tools for waste reduction and process enhancement and acceleration. The course also covers how to map out processes and identify sources of variation, as well as to gain a basic understanding of descriptive statistical analysis. Finally, they will learn how to perform basic pilot studies and analyze the results, in order to determine the most effective way to improve and stabilize processes. Candidates work on either an integrated health care case study or on an actual business project, and will apply classroom techniques to the project.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of the course, student will be able to:

  1. Understand Lean Six Sigma history and philosophy and how it applies to modern health care organizations.
  2. Identify opportunities for system and process improvement in health care settings.
  3. Use basic problem solving and critical thinking skills and apply systems thinking to quality improvement projects in hospitals and other clinical settings.
  4. Apply techniques to decrease health care costs, increase patient safety, improve treatment outcomes, and increase customer satisfaction.
  5. Identify valid and critical to quality customer and business requirements and related measures and then turn the data into actionable information to manage and improve organizational processes.
  6. Map out work processes using Excel/Visio to identify sources of waste.
  7. Apply the PDCA model in accordance with Lean Six Sigma principles.
  8. Conduct beginning-level statistical analyses, as well as perform basic experiments and analyze data to determine the most effective way to improve and stabilize processes.
  9. Analyze measurement patterns and results of biomedical information utilizing basic statistical concepts in conjunction with Lean Six Sigma-specific software (e.g.,SigmaXL) to synthesize pertinent data.
  10. Identify basic root causes for typical process challenges.

No. of Credits: 3

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: This class will provide students with introductory understanding of clinical analysts' daily responsibilities and functions within hospitals. Students will be introduced to daily operations of clinical software systems and lead to understand how such systems are used by health care organizations to provide quality care services.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • Analyze the management and support of clinical users' HIT business needs
  • Evaluate how clinical information systems are used to improve quality of care
  • Illustrate and apply commonly used HIT terminologies
  • Take the CPHIMSS examination for certification

No. of Credits: 3

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: Medical data transmission using wireless technologies continues to play an increasing role in the health care industry. This course introduces fundamental knowledge of telemedicine technologies. Essential aspects of wireless technologies in patient care, medical information processing, telemedicine systems deployment, safeguarding medical data and privacy, and future trends in healthcare technologies are covered. Discussions also includes technical perspectives, overview of telemedicine, planning and deployment considerations, scalability to support future growth, integration with existing infrastructure, information security, cryptography, and other critical components of telemedicine technologies.

Learning Objectives:

After completing the course students should be able to:

  • Comprehend primary concepts of telemedicine technologies
  • Understand the fundamentally technologies used in telemedicine
  • Delineate the capabilities of wireless networks
  • Review the challenges and limitations of current technology associated with health care information systems
  • Demonstrate telemedicine wireless communication basics
  • Describe the technologies in medical information processing
  • Discuss wireless telemedicine systems deployment
  • Expand their knowledge of wireless technologies in patient monitoring
  • Apply information technologies in disaster response and in rural areas
  • Explain the technologies for safeguarding medical data and privacy cryptography
  • Discuss future trends in healthcare technology

No. of Credits: 3

Pre-Requisite: MI 6413

Description:Lean Six Sigma for Health Care (Green Belt) participants learn the skills, tools, and techniques to deliver breakthrough business improvements and cost reductions, and prepare for the Lean Six Sigma Green Belt certification exam. Lean Six Sigma Green Belt candidates will learn to function simultaneously inside two frameworks, the business framework and the Six Sigma cultural framework. They will learn to develop a comprehensive set of 15-20 Lean Six Sigma process improvement toolsets by focusing on the define, measure, analyze, improve, and control (DMAIC) approach to process improvement. They will learn techniques for both quantitative and non-quantitative analysis, as well as methods and tools for waste reduction and process enhancement and acceleration. The course also covers how to map out processes and identify sources of variation, as well as to gain a basic understanding of statistical analysis. Finally, they will learn how to perform basic experiments and analyze data, in order to determine the most effective way to improve and stabilize a process. Candidates work on either an integrated health care case study or on an actual business project, and will apply classroom techniques to the project.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of the course, student will be able to:

  1. Understand Lean Six Sigma implementation strategies for modern health care organizations
  2. Identify opportunities for system and process improvement in health care settings.
  3. Use intermediate level problem solving and critical thinking skills on quality improvement projects in hospitals and other clinical settings.
  4. Identify valid and critical to quality customer and business requirements and related measures and then turn the data into actionable information to manage and improve organizational processes.
  5. Develop break-through equations to identify the important X and Y measures in processes and systems.
  6. Apply the DMAIC model in accordance with Lean Six Sigma principles.
  7. Map out health care value streams and other high level processes to identify sources of variation, and to acquire a beginning-level understanding of inferential statistical analysis, as well as learn to perform basic experiments and analyze data to determine the most effective way to improve and stabilize processes.
  8. Conduct measurement system analysis to determine measurement reliability and validity.
  9. Analyze measurement patterns and results of biomedical information utilizing basic statistical concepts in conjunction with Lean Six Sigma-specific software (e.g.,SigmaXL) to synthesize pertinent data.
  10. Conduct basic risk analysis and contingency planning.
  11. Conduct quantitative root cause analysis.
  12. Develop process improvement control plans.

No. of Credits: 3

Pre-Requisite: MI 5120, MI 5130, MI 5200

Description: This course will provide students with the opportunity to learn the fundamentals of set-up and using the applications of one of the most commonly used electronic health record systems in the US, NextGen, in clinical settings. Students will be required to complete the NextGen e-learning modules before the on campus hands on training sessions.

This course is required for the competitive internship opportunity in the NSU clinics (more details to follow).

Learning Objectives:

After completion of the course students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate the ability to use and set-up NextGen EHR and ExpressRx applications
  • Use the Knowledge Base Model (KBM) templates and workflows
  • Complete at least one demonstration of Stage 1 Meaningful use with NexGen solutions
  • Evaluate the current use of clinical application of NextGen at NSU clinics
  • Identify ways to improve the functionality and workflow for NSU clinics

No. of Credits: 3

Pre-Requisite:

  • Learned at least one programming language in C, C++, C# or Java
  • A Mac computer (MacBook Pro, MacBook Air, or others) that runs Mac OS X 10.7 (Lion) or over

Description: This course provides an introduction to iOS Applications (apps) development with an emphasis on health information technology projects. Topics cover iOS development environment setup, Objective C language syntax, Model-View-Controller design patterns, iOS apps lifecycle, GUI implementation, multi-touch handling, graphics processing, file handling, SQLite database handling, audio and video processing, multi-platform support for iPhone and iPad, maps displaying, and web service interfacing.

Learning Objectives:

After completing this course, a student will be able to:

  1. use the Objective C language and the Model-View-Controller design patterns to design and implement healthcare related apps on iOS platforms such as iPhone and iPad
  2. design and implement GUIs on mobile devices to meet industry design criteria;
  3. handle interactions with the multi-touch screen
  4. add graphics, animations, audio and video into apps
  5. use the built-in sensors to capture and process audio and video
  6. integrate web services in apps
  7. describe the limitations and necessary tradeoffs involved in designing healthcare apps for resource-constrained platforms

No. of Credits: 3

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: This course will provide students with a preliminary understanding of the theory and practice of medical image processing and analysis in healthcare. Basic concepts and fundamentals of medical image processing and analysis will be described in the course. The application of medical image processing and analysis in biomedical information systems will be discussed. Students will be introduced to the fundamentals and methodology of digital image processing, image analysis, image compression, and recognition.

No. of Credits: 3

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: This course will introduce students to geographic information systems (GIS) to map and spatially analyze public health and demographic data. Students will learn the fundamentals of the ArcMap software system and ways to integrate cartography into biomedical informatics practice. Beyond use of GIS for cartography, this course will also examine ethical issues and methods of analyzing demographic and spatial health patterns using GIS and demography analysis methods. The versatility of GIS in a public health setting will be examined and will include exercises involving GIS applications in health marketing, demography, epidemiology, and health care systems. For example, we will look at how different socioeconomic groups use urban spaces differently in terms of transportation and how these differences in navigation impact contact points for health marketing. Other issues covered in the class will be the ethics of GIS, manipulation of data, sources of data, and understanding some commonly used public health datasets such as the YRBS, BRFSS, and US Census.

No. of Credits: 3

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: The course will introduce the clinical workflow analysis as a method of choice to improve clinical processes in healthcare delivery systems. Students will review the primary objectives for process improvement in clinical healthcare: outcome quality (including patient safety) and the development of health information technology (HIT) to support the Electronic Health Record (EHR) with initiatives showing a significant impact on clinical workflows (e.g. meaningful use). Students will define the functional components of the healthcare activities and learn to map on a flowchart the standard symbols used to represent all tasks and steps, decision points, resources, and outcomes of the clinical workflow. Students will apply the tools of workflow analysis by assessing a workflow in a healthcare setting using graphical representations of the workflow phases (current state, desired state), and process defects identification and classification. The course will introduce the quantitative measures of workflow improvement used in Lean Six-Sigma. Students will formalize a proposal for an intervention aimed at the modification and optimization of a clinical workflow.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Define business processes and process improvement in healthcare from the patient, clinician, and analyst perspective.
  2. Recognize two major challenging objectives for improvement in healthcare: 1) quality and patient safety and 2) meaningful use of EHR.
  3. Map the components of a clinical workflow chronologically into a flowchart, using the standard symbolic shapes for tasks and steps, decisions and processes, resources, inputs and outputs, connectors, and outcomes.
  4. Assess clinical workflow efficiency with workflow analysis by identifying differences with the desired state, identification of process defects, and root-cause analysis.
  5. Define the quantitative measures used to assess workflow improvement in Lean Six Sigma.
  6. Create the workflow representation of a clinical process in a healthcare setting and present a strategy for improvement.

No. of Credits: 3

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: In the ever changing world of information and global economic competition it is crucial that individuals and organizations understand their personal as well as group talents. Today’s educational, healthcare and institutional structures lack leadership and cutting edge thinking. By applying strength based leadership practices one comes to understand their own as well as the group’s strengths and talents and is able to apply these practices in their daily work as well as in leadership roles.

The course will produce a personal understanding of individual as well as group talents and how these evolve in individuals. Students will develop a better self-awareness of what talents and strengths they possess and how this affects personal as well as work performance. It demonstrates how leaders continue to grow and how they develop each of the group’s talents to maximize the performance of the organization. The Affordable Care Act will be emphasized and students will discover what individual as well as organizational talents must be utilized to improve patient care as well as cutting health care costs.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Develop a true understanding your strengths and talents.
  2. Articulate how you have used your talents in daily work and personal performance.
  3. Analyze which strengths apply best to various tasks required in the use of health technology.
  4. Assess the talents of the class and determine which person performs best in different situations.
  5. Evaluate which talents are best suited for various positions in the Health IT industry including healthcare organizations.
  6. Recognize the importance of results driven organizations using individual talents to increase effectiveness.
  7. Conclude which talents are best suited for assessing.
  8. Conclude which talents are best suited for evaluating.
  9. Conclude which talents are best suited for refining.
  10. Conclude which talents are best suited for leadership.
  11. Conclude which talents are best suited for customizing.
  12. Conclude which talents are best suited for developing.
  13. Conclude which talents are best suited for managing.

 

*All courses are online. Each course must be successfully completed with a grade of B to be eligible for the certificate.

Admission Requirements

Test results must be sent directly from the testing agency to the center you applied. Proof of English language competency can also be in the form of successful completion of a degree at an approved U.S. institution of higher education.

Program Length

Students have a maximum of five years to complete the program. The expected average completion time is 2-4 terms.

Tuition and Fees

Tuition is $650 per credit hour. A Health Professions Division student access fee of $145 is required each year. An NSU student service fee of $315 is charged each term that a student is registered for two or more courses (only half is charged in terms where a student is registered for only one course). Tuition and fees are subject to change without notice.

Estimated Expenses

Books and supplies for 18 credit hours are estimated at $4,101. Room and board is estimated as follows: